People

Bok Yeop Ahn

Bok Yeop Ahn

Korea University, PhD
Bok Yeop Ahn received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Korea University in 2006 and joined the Lewis research group in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) as a postdoctoral researcher. During his Ph.D., he worked for the Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT) in the Advanced Materials Division and focused his researches on the transition metal oxide nanoparticles, sol-gel coatings, and alkyl-modified silica core/shell microcapsules. He moved to Harvard University in 2013 and currently holds the title of Senior Research Scientist in the Lewis Research Group through the Wyss Institute and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). He focuses his efforts on the development of functional inks and direct-write assembly of printed electronics, 3D microbatteries, and 3D bio-architectures.
NWL B146.40
John Ahrens

John Ahrens - G3

Stanford University, Biomechanical Engineering, BS
I am interested in 3D printing scalable, vascularized tissues that could improve current stem cell derived disease models and regenerative therapies.
ESL 101
Michael Bell

Michael Bell

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology Computer Engineering, BS; Mechanical Engineering, BS
NSF Graduate Research Fellow
Harvard Pierce Fellow
Evolving 3D printed objects from more than metal brackets and plastic toys requires the synergy of engineering disciplines and materials science. With a background in computer engineering, mechanical engineering, robotics and current PhD work in materials science I lead cutting edge research in 3D printed electronics at Harvard. I develop patent-pending machines, processes and materials to 3D print entire electromechanical devices, from simple embedded antennas to entire cell phones using integrated pick-and place technologies.
NWL B148.30
Nicole Black - G5

Nicole Black - G5

Boston University, Biomedical Engineering, BS
NSF Graduate Research Fellow
I am interested in the relationship between structure and function at the micron-scale in living tissues. My research investigates 3D printed biodegradable elastomeric grafts that can be remodeled into mechanically anisotropic tissues in vitro and in vivo. Currently, I am working with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary to design tympanic membrane grafts with tailored motion patterns in response to acoustic stimuli. Eventually, we hope that this technology will improve hearing outcomes following tympanoplasty surgery.
NWL B148.30
Travis Busbee

Travis Busbee

Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, BS
The coupling of mechanical forces with electrical signals could pave the way for the development of fully 3D printed functional devices capable of sensing and actuation. I am working to develop piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymer inks to add a new tool into the 3D printing toolbox. I am also working at the intersection of electronics and biology to use 3D printing to simplify the production of Lab-on-a-Chip assays for high throughput drug screenings.
NWL B148.30
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Luca Calderari

ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Health Science and Technology
"As a master thesis student, I study drug crystal-induced kidney injuries using the 3D vascularized proximal tubule model previously developed in the Lewis Lab. In particular, I am interested in the crystal formation within the in vitro microphysiological system and how it leads to nephropathy."
NW Building
Alex Chortos

Alex Chortos

Stanford University, PhD
During his PhD, Alex investigated processes for fabricating intrinsically stretchable transistors and pressure sensors for biomimetic and neuromorphic electronics. In the Lewis Lab, Alex is developing printed electronics for bio-interfacing applications.
NWL B148.30
Emily Davidson

Emily Davidson

UC Berkeley, PhD
Emily Davidson received her PhD in Chemical Engineering working with Professor Rachel Segalman. There, she studied the impact of confinement within block copolymer microdomains on the crystallization of conjugated polymers, and examined the role of controlled polymer stiffness on the self-assembly of sequence-controlled block copolymers. In the Lewis Lab, Emily's research focuses on 3-D printing block copolymer and shape-memory polymers to control the local anisotropic optical and mechanical properties in 3-D printed structures.
NWL B148.30
Daniele Foresti

Daniele Foresti

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, PhD
Society in Science - Branco Weiss Fellow
The inherent limits of the existing printing technologies strongly restrict the range of possible inks (i.e.materials) that can be dispensed, hence the potential applications of such technologies. Could we do better? As a Branco Weiss fellow, I will investigate a new concept of printing mechanism based on ultrasound. By using acoustic forces any ink could be potentially printed on any substrate.
NWL B146.40
Kimberly Homan

Kimberly Homan

University of Texas at Austin, Biomedical Engineering, PhD
Can 3D printing be used to create organs? My research tackles this challenge through the study of cell inks and the dynamic interactions of various cell types in biomaterials once printed and vascularized.
NWL B148.10
Jeremy Huang - G4

Jeremy Huang - G4

University of California at San Diego, Electrical and Computer Engineering, MS
University of California at Berkeley, Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, BS
As a PhD student at Harvard Medical School who is co-advised by Professor Lewis, my work focuses on gene-regulation and cell-lineage decision making in the early mammalian embryo. In collaboration with the Lewis group, I am interested in how maternal in vivo conditions can be recapitulated in vitro.
NWL B148.30
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Dimitri Kokkinis

ETH Zurich, PhD
During his PhD, Dimitri developed materials and processes for the 3D printing of architected materials and studied their mechanical behavior. In the Lewis Lab, his research focuses on multimaterial 3D printing of gradients and composites for soft robotics applications.
NWL B146.40
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Arda Kotikian - G4

Mount Holyoke College, Chemistry & Math, BA
NSF Graduate Research Fellow

I am working on programming 3D shape change in actuators by controlling molecular orientation at the filamentary scale while programming structure at the macroscopic scale via direct ink writing. I am especially interested in developing 3D liquid crystal elastomer actuators for use in soft robotics.... Read more about Arda Kotikian - G4

NWL B148.30