Post-Docs

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Natalie Larson

University of California Santa Barbara, PhD

During her PhD, Natalie developed methods to study microstructure evolution in ceramic matrix composites using X-ray computed tomography. In the Lewis Lab, her research is focused on multimaterial 3D printing of structural and functional materials with locally tailored structure and composition.

NWL B148.10
Alex Chortos

Alex Chortos

Stanford University, PhD
During his PhD, Alex investigated processes for fabricating intrinsically stretchable transistors and pressure sensors for biomimetic and neuromorphic electronics. In the Lewis Lab, Alex is developing printed electronics for bio-interfacing applications.
NWL B148.30
Emily Davidson

Emily Davidson

UC Berkeley, PhD
Emily Davidson received her PhD in Chemical Engineering working with Professor Rachel Segalman. There, she studied the impact of confinement within block copolymer microdomains on the crystallization of conjugated polymers, and examined the role of controlled polymer stiffness on the self-assembly of sequence-controlled block copolymers. In the Lewis Lab, Emily's research focuses on 3-D printing block copolymer and shape-memory polymers to control the local anisotropic optical and mechanical properties in 3-D printed structures.
NWL B148.30
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Zoey Davidson

University of Pennsylvania, PhD
Zoey received his PhD in soft matter physics at the University of Pennsylvania and then moved to the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems where he developed electrically driven liquid crystal elastomer actuators. In the Clarke and Lewis groups, his research focuses on materials and device design to improve performance and fabrication of electrically driven soft actuators. Using materials and methods such as liquid crystal elastomers and 3D printing, he is creating new actuation mechanisms for soft robotics with an eye on the fundamental physics to better understand these systems. 
NWL B148.30
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Dimitri Kokkinis

ETH Zurich, PhD
During his PhD, Dimitri developed materials and processes for the 3D printing of architected materials and studied their mechanical behavior. In the Lewis Lab, his research focuses on multimaterial 3D printing of gradients and composites for soft robotics applications.
NWL B146.40
Neil Lin

Neil Lin

Cornell University, PhD
Roche Fellow
During his PhD, Neil studied the flow behavior of soft materials at the microscopic scale using 3D imagebased flow measurements and customized rheometry. In the Lewis Lab, Neil is working on 3D printing of highly vascularized tissues. In particular, he focuses on developing methods and bio-inks creating kidney models that recapitulate human responses.
NWL B148.30
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Jochen Mueller

ETH Zurich, PhD
My research aims to create materials and structures with novel and outstanding (mechanical) properties. To achieve these properties, I develop new fabrication techniques based on the direct-ink writing process and combine them with computational methods to fully exploit the design space.
NWL B148.30
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Daniel S. Reynolds

Boston University, Ph.D.

During his Ph.D., Daniel developed 3D in vitro tumor models to study how the tumor microenvironment’s physical properties contribute to cancer progression. At the Lewis Research Group, Daniel’s research focuses on using 3D bioprinting to manufacture vascularized biological tissues for applications in both regenerative medicine and disease modeling.

NWL B146.40
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Sanlin Robinson

Cornell University, Materials Science & Engineering, PhD

I am interested in manufacturing large-scale, vascularized tissue constructs to enable the translation of our foundational technologies.

CLSB 206-14A